Elementary Latin Kalendis Martiis UPDATED

Due to water damage in McDermott 308, Elementary Latin will meet Wednesday in the Bastek Honors House, 127 Glenwood Ave., from 9- 9.50am.

Passage to prepare for midterm (March 4, Thursday). Translate the first three sentences up to “neque canem videbant”.

The midterm will consist of two parts: (1) prepared translation (anything from “Iulia parva” to “neque canem videbant” and (2) sight translation (anything from the rest of the passage).

Iulia parva puella Romana erat, quae duos fratres habebat.
Cum eis semper esse cupiebat; illi tamen eam discedere iubebant.
“Puellas,” inquiunt, “in ludos nostros non accipimus, nam nos paene viri sumus.”

Primo aestatis die, fratres ad mare constituerunt, nam propter magnum aestum nare cupiebant.

Iulia etiam cum eis ambulare incipiebat, sed illi currebant et mox ab eis relicta est. [relicta est = “was left behind”]

In villa patris manere recusavit et cum cane, qui propter aetatem gravis erat et iam non currere poterat, post fratres discessit.

Hi neque eam neque canem videbant.


The sight translation part of the exam will come from rest of the passage, which I’ll post below by late Monday night. If you would like to work on translating them, you can email me at kchew@spc.edu with your translation and any questions up till Wednesday night.

Here’s the sight part!

Ubi ad mare venit Iulia, fratres magno cum clamore in aqua ruebant.

Illa post saxum sedebat et eos spectabat.

Subito unus de pueris clamavit:

“Polypus meos pedes capit!”

Ad eum navit frater, quem quoque polypus ceperat.

Iulia magno timore ad villam cucurrit; iam currebat etiam canis.

Ad mare vocavit patrem, a quo pueri e magno mortis periculo servati sunt. [were saved]

Itaque postea fratres sororem in ludos semper acceperint.

Click on “more” to see the translation we went over in class.

 

Iulia parva puella Romana erat, quae duos fratres habebat. (imperfect)

Julia was a small Roman girl, who had two brothers.

                                                                                                                                              

 

Cum eis semper esse cupiebat; illi tamen eam discedere iubebant.

She was desiring to always with them; nevertheless, those ordered her to go away.                                                              

Eam = f., accusative, singular, from is, ea, id.

 

 

 

“Puellas,” inquiunt, “in ludos nostros non accipimus, nam nos paene viri sumus.”

“We do not accept girls in our games,” they say, “for we are almost men.”

Inquiunt. They say

Ludus. Game

Noster. Our   nos = we/us                                                                                

Accipio, accipere, accepi. Receive, accept.

Nam. For

Paene. Almost

Vir. Man

Sumus – from the verb “esse.”

Adulescens. Young man

 

 

Primo aestatis die, fratres ad mare ire constituerunt, nam propter magnum aestum nare cupiebant.

On the first summer day/first day of summer, brothers decided to go to the sea, for on account of big/great heat, they desired to swim.

Primus. First                                                                                                               

Aestas, aestatis. Summer          aestus. Heat, boiling.

Dies, day

Frater, fratris. Brother.

Ad. To, towards.

Mare. Sea

Ire. To go

Nam. For

Propter. On account of

No, nare, navi. Swim.   Navis = ship

Constituo, constituere, constitui.  Decide

Cupio, cupere, cupi.   Desire.

 

 

 

Iulia etiam cum eis ambulare incipiebat, sed illi currebant et mox ab eis relicta est. [relicta est = “was left behind”]

Julia still began to walk with them, but they ran and soon she was left behind by them.

Etiam. Still

Ambulare. To walk

Incipio, incipere, incepi. Begin

Sed. But

Curro, currere, cucurri. Run

Et. And

Mox. Soon

Ab. by

 

In villa patris manere recusavit et cum cane, qui propter aetatem gravis erat et iam non currere poterat, post fratres discessit.

In the house of (her) father she refused to stay and with the dog, who on account of his age was slow and was not able to run now, she departed after/behind her brothers.

Propter. On account of     aetas, aetatis. Age     gravis. Heavy, serious, slow    iam. Now, already     currere. To run

 

Hi neque eam neque canem videbant.

These [brothers] saw neither her nor the dog.

 

Hi. Hic, haec, how

Neque……neque…… neither ….. now.    

Canis. Dog.

Video, videre.  see                             

 

 

 

 

(ch 12)

Perfect Tense   “I have walked”  i, isti, it, imus, istis, erunt

Accipio, accipere, accepi.  Receive, accept. 

 

Pluperfect Tense “I had walked” eram, eras, erat, eramus, eratis, errant

Future Perfect Tense “I will have walked” ero, eris, erit, erimus, eritis, erint

 

 

Is, ea, id.  He, she, it. (ch 11)

Ille, illa, illud. Singular = that   plural = those (ch 9)

Hic, haec, hoc.  Singular = this   plural = these (ch 9)

 

 

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About kristinachew

classicist | translator (of ancient Greek & Latin poetry & drama) View all posts by kristinachew

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