Homework due February 22

Salvete, omnes discipuli discipulaeque! / γειά σου!

Elementary Latin

  1. Read ch. 15 and 16 on numbers and 3rd declension adjectives.
  2. Learn the numbers I – XX.
  3. Decline:  celer dux   AND   forte animal.
  4. Sentences (Sententiae Antiquae), 3, 6, p. 101.

Classics and Film

  1. Finish watching 300.
  2. Final version of paper on the Odyssey and one film is due: Please email to me kchew@spc.edu.Email me (kchew@spc.edu) at least one page about the movie that you are writing about for your paper.
  3. Here is the assignment again:
  1. Essay on the Odyssey and O Brother Where Art Thou OR Warriors: Write a 3-4 page essay in which you focus on two scenes from the poem and discuss how they are depicted in the movie.
  • Summarize the two scenes from the Odyssey and explain why they are important to the poem.
  • Describe the corresponding scenes in the movie you have chosen.
  • Explain how ‘faithful’ the movie is to Homer’s poem and why, based on consideration of the movie as a whole, these changes were made.
  • In writing about the movie, you will need to provide a brief plot summary and description of the characters.
  • You will not need to use any secondary sources/articles for this paper, aside from Homer’s Odyssey and the movie.
  • Due dates: (1) 15 Feb., submission of 1 page (at least) about the Odyssey; (2) 18 Feb., submission of 1 page (at least) about the movie; (3) 22 Feb., final paper due: Please email to me kchew@spc.edu.

Elementary Greek

  1. Review ch. 15 on contract verbs.
  2. Conjugate in the present, imperfect, future: Verbs with an α stem (γελαω—laugh)—Verbs with an ο stem (δηλοω—make clear).
  3. Vocabulary for lesson 15, p. 94.
  4. p. 95, sentences 6 and 7.
  5. A chart with that tell you how to conjugate verbs in ALL tenses and more is here: Present System Active of Verbs

http://www.wepapers.com/Papers/48106/files/swf/45001To50000/48106.swf?dummy=786808927
greek_grammer-_Contract_Verb_PDF_Chart

Intermediate Latin

  1. Selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses on King Midas.

About kristinachew

classicist | translator (of ancient Greek & Latin poetry & drama) View all posts by kristinachew

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: