See You At the Exam(s)

**Please be sure to complete the online course evaluation; thank you!!**

Elementary Latin – exam at 9am, 21 December, Friday

  1. See the Cheat Sheet for what's on the exam.
  2. Any questions? You can email Dr. Chew at kchew@saintpeters.edu.

Elementary Greek – exam at 12 noon, 19 December, Wednesday

  1. See the Cheat Sheet for what's on the exam.
  2. Any questions? You can email Dr. Chew at kchew@saintpeters.edu.

Greek history – exam at 12 noon, 21 December, Friday

Any questions? You can email Dr. Chew at kchew@saintpeters.edu.

Exam format: You will be asked to write about TWO of these questions. You can bring in your notes and books. In your essay, you must cite at least three places in Herodotus and/Thucydides to support your ideas.

One way to prepare for this exam is to write out an outline of how you would answer the question and to note specific passages (with page numbers) in Herodotus and Thucydides that you would use and quote from. Two passages that you might wish to use:

  • Opening statement of Herodotus (Book 1):

“These are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, which he publishes, in the hope of thereby preserving from decay the remembrance of what men have done, and of preventing the great and wonderful actions of the Greeks and the barbarians from losing their due meed of glory; and to put on record what were their grounds of feuds. .. For the cities which were formerly great have most of them become insignificant; and such as are at present powerful, were weak in the olden time. I shall therefore discourse equally of both, convinced that human happiness never continues long in one stay.”

Statement from Thucydides' “Archaeology” (Book 1)

“And with reference to the narrative of events, far from permitting myself to derive it from the first source that came to hand, I did not even trust my own impressions, but it rests partly on what I saw myself, partly on what others saw for me, the accuracy of the report being always tried by the most severe and detailed tests possible. My conclusions have cost me some labor from the want of coincidence between accounts of the same occurrences by different eye-witnesses, arising sometimes from imperfect memory, sometimes from undue partiality for one side or the other. The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the interpretation of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time.”

  1. Based on Herodotus' opening statement, what does he envision as the purpose of his Histories? Does he achieve this purpose? Discuss at least three passages to illustrate your position.
  2. In what ways is Herodotus' historical method similar to and also different from the methods of a modern historian? Consider: (1) what is evidence and proof for Herodotus; (2) what sources Herodotus uses and how critically he uses them; and (3) the ways in which Herodotus deals with conflicts and disagreements among his sources (i.e. does he ignore them? Try to resolve them? Leave it up to the reader?).
  3. Does Herodotus make a clear distinction between myth and history? Does he recognize gods or Fate as elements in his scheme of causation? If he does see gods or Fate as behind historical events, does this (in your eyes) destroy his credibility?
  4. Based on this statement from Thucydides, what does he envision as the purpose of his Histories? Does he achieve this purpose? Discuss at least three passages to illustrate your position.
  5. The plague in book 2: Why does Thucydides include his description of the effects of the plague on Athens immediately after Pericles' picture of the Athenian spirit? Why does the plague have such dire effects on Athenian institutions, according to Thucydides and what does this suggest about human institutions in general? Do you think that Thucydides intends to draw a lesson about the war from the effects of the plague?
  6. In view of the passages (see below) that we have read in Thucydides, does his work in any way help us to better understand American democracy and foreign policy? Discuss at least three passages/events to illustrate your position.

A multiple choice exam to help you review Thucydides' history.

This is a list of ALL the passages in the Landmark Edition of Thucydides that you are expected to have read:

  • Pericles’ first speech (pp. 79 – 85).
  • Pericles’ Funeral Oration, the plague of Athens, Pericles’ third speech defending his position & policy; Thucydides’ analysis of Pericles and the causes of Athens’ eventual defeat (pp. 110 – 128).
  • Pericles’ third speech defending his position & policy; Thucydides’ analysis of Pericles and the causes of Athens’ eventual defeat (pp. 110 – 128).
  • The Mytilenian Debate – Book 3.36-50 (pp. 175-184)
  • Civil War in Corcyra – Book 3.69-85 (pp.194-201)
  • The Melian Dialogue – Book 5.84-116 (pp. 350-357)

The Peloponnesian War (431-404 BCE) — timeline of major treaties and battles


Intermediate Greek

  1. Plato's Apology of Socrates

 

About kristinachew

classicist | translator (of ancient Greek & Latin poetry & drama) View all posts by kristinachew

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